Marshall McLuhan coined the term “the medium is the message” in his 1964 book, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man.

While McLuhan was being somewhat tongue-in-cheek, too many high-tech marketers seem to have taken his statement as gospel.

There is a widespread focus on how many Tweets, Facebook posts, LinkedIn messages, and so forth are being generated, and how many “hits” or “likes” these dispatches get.

While there is nothing inherently wrong with using these media to get your message out, there is a whole lot wrong with spending valuable time generating busywork and noise rather than actual sales.

If you don’t know your actual social media ROI—how many dollars you’re earning per dollar of spend—you’re just spinning your wheels.

Rather than being just another commoditized voice trying to scream over the roar of everyone else on social media, spend some time crafting a better message:

  • Why should customers buy from you?
  • What problems (preferably big, expensive problems) do you solve?
  • What results will customers get from you that they can’t get from your competitors?
  • What proof do you offer in support of your claims?
  • How do you reduce—or eliminate—customers’ risk when they buy from you?
  • What kind of ROI can your customers expect?

Having a clear, compelling message is especially important given that the high-tech audience you’re trying to reach is well-educated, sophisticated, and skeptical. They don’t want hype. They want results.

Whether you’re speaking with a customer technologist who will use your product, or a customer executive who will sign the purchase order for it, you need a clear, differentiated message that gets attention, creates curiosity, and starts a conversation that leads to a sale.

The bottom line? Spend more time and energy on figuring out why customers should buy your products and pay your prices. If you run that message consistently through your marketing and social media posts, your voice will carry above the crowd—regardless of the medium.