Customers like having choices. That’s why manufacturers of cars, computers, phones, and just about everything else offer multiple versions of products, at different prices, with different levels of value. This works because not all customers perceive value the same way, nor are they willing to pay the same price.

There are three basic kinds of buyers:

  1. Price buyers: Price is always their #1 decision criteria.
  2. Value buyers: They are openly willing to pay more for more value.
  3. Poker players: They are willing to pay for value but won’t admit it. (Most customers are poker players.)

To attract all three types of buyers, many businesses offer three well-defined and profitable versions of a product at different prices, with more bells and whistles added at each price point. This ensures that customers get what they’re willing to pay for, but not too much more. If they want more, they can move up to the next version.

The beauty of versions is that they guide the customer toward the product he or she is willing to pay for. This makes everything that follows easier because you’ve addressed price and specs up front, at the beginning of the sales process. (By the end of the sales process, you’ve invested too much time, money, and emotion to walk away, even if it’s in your best interest to do so.)

It’s human nature to want the best version at the lowest price, so it’s the salesperson’s job to figure out what is most important to the customer and steer the customer toward the best fit. Price, performance, payment terms, credit, warranty, field support, product and process improvement, and delivery can all be versioned.

You might be thinking, “Versions wouldn’t work for us because our customers give us the spec they want us to meet, and we respond to that spec.” While that may be true to some extent, remember that a spec is usually a wish list, not a list of must-haves. Again, it’s up to the salesperson to figure out which specs matter and which don’t, and to negotiate and quote the appropriate price.

I’ve used versions to ensure that customers like Intel, Micron, Texas Instruments, and TSMC get what they’re willing to pay for, so I know it can be done. I once used versions to negotiate a $50M service contract with Intel that included a 20% price increase over the previous year.

It’s important to remember that no sales strategy or tactic works in all circumstances all the time. What I’m suggesting is that you try versioning a few times and see what happens. If you do it right and stick with it, your profit will improve. And isn’t that why we’re all in business in the first place?