Once you’ve made a job offer that has been accepted, it’s time to get your new salesperson up to speed as quickly as possible—meaning, as profitable as possible ASAP.

Unfortunately, much of what passes for sales training is really product training, designed to show salespeople how products work. Or it’s generic, with the material being too broad to be of much real use.

You get only one chance to write on the “blank slate” of a new salesperson at your company, so it’s important not to waste the opportunity with training that doesn’t make a real difference.

Sales training delivers the best results when it’s designed specifically for the people being trained, the situations those people regularly face, and the problems your company seeks to solve for its customers.

I suggest designing your sales training around the following questions. If you go into them in depth with your new salespeople, they will come away with an excellent understanding of both your company and their role in it:

  1. What value do we offer customers that they can’t get from our competitors?
  2. What specific problems do our products and services solve, in what situations, and for which customers?
  3. How much do those problems cost our customers? How do we know? How much are they willing to spend to make those problems go away?
  4. What do good and bad business look like, from our company’s perspective?
  5. What types of customers and prospects aren’t good for our business? Those who:
    • Always buy from whichever supplier provides the lowest price
    • Steal our intellectual property
    • Share our confidential information with our competitors
    • Require too much time or hand-holding
    • Are excessively difficult, rude, or demanding
    • Actually cost us money, when all is said and done
    • Ask for endless estimates and proposals but never close the deal
    • (Your reason(s) here)
  6. How do you recognize and turn away bad business?
  7. How and when should you address price and money with customers?
  8. What method do we use to price our products and services?
  9. Why do those prices make sense relative to what customers get in return?
  10. What business case can we make to justify our prices?
  11. Do we have customer testimonials, data, and ROI calculators that support our claims of value?
  12. When customers or prospects tell us they’re not interested or don’t have problems, what information, results, and proof can we use to get their attention and paint the picture of a “better future”?
  13. Which prospects should you approach first, and why?
  14. What questions and objections should you expect, and how do you respond to them?

You get the idea. Train them for the real world—not the world as you’d like it to be—with practical specifics and strategies rather than vague mission statements and models.

Next time, I’ll talk about the mechanics of training new salespeople—including scheduling, slide design, and delivery.