It’s to your advantage to deal with actual product users rather than professional purchasers, whenever possible. This can be tricky, as purchasing employees try to ensure that all or most communications go through purchasing. But there are ways around this.

I always recommend that my clients use email to document every conversation with purchasing, and then send that email to everyone involved in the negotiation at both the seller and buyer companies.

As a best practice, send a well-written, fact-filled email once a week (or more often, if warranted) to all the key people involved in the negotiation. This can include:

  • customer executives
  • users of your products
  • your own management team

These emails should document any agreements and commitments made by both sides during the previous week and may contain everything from direct quotes from purchasing people to slips in the product delivery schedule (due to negotiations that never seem to end).

You might also include any threats made by purchasing representatives.

Shedding some daylight on the threats, pressure, name-calling, outrageous demands, etc. by purchasing tends to reduce this bad behavior.

If purchasing balks at the idea of these emails (and they will), I tell my clients to respond matter-of-factly that management insists on keeping everyone informed and up to date, with all relevant details fully documented. Doing this will also motivate all parties to behave with civility and honesty, and to keep the rhetoric to a minimum.

Even if you are fortunate enough to be dealing with professional, courteous, well-behaved purchasing people (lucky you!), it’s still very helpful to have this kind of real-time reporting and documentation going on. Written records are your friend.