Even the most interesting and relevant sales training material can fall flat if it’s not delivered well. Here are some dos and don’ts to keep your employees engaged, attentive, and learning:

DO

  • Know what you’re talking about. One of the best ways to prepare is to write a one-page summary, as if you’re writing an advertisement. The one-page limit forces you to prioritize what you’re going to say, be concise, and organize your most important points in a logical order—and envisioning it as an ad discourages you from being boring.
  • Get organized. Lay out your presentation on index cards (real or virtual), then arrange them by priority with the most important information up front.
  • Introduce yourself and briefly describe what you’re going to talk about, and why the audience should care. Always be thinking of your training from the audience’s perspective—what’s in it for them?
  • Start a fire. Get their attention by saying something counterintuitive or unconventional. Here are some examples:
    • “A 1% price increase can equal a 10% increase in net profit. Here’s how.”
    • “Cheap people don’t make good value sellers. Here’s why.”
    • “Professional buyers are amateur actors. Here’s the evidence.”
  • Talk about the most important stuff first. That way, if your presentation is interrupted before you’re finished—or if attention eventually flags, as can happen with even the best presentations—you’ve gotten your key points in.
  • Talk about no more than six subjects every hour. This recommendation is based on new research from the University of Washington. If you’re talking about a product, for example, you could divide the talk into the following six subjects:
    • The reasons why you developed the product
    • The unique advantages the product delivers to customers
    • The customers who are most likely to need the product, and why
    • The price you’re asking and why that price makes sense, relative to the results customers get in return
    • Any problems with the product and why it might not be the best solution for certain customers (see below)
    • Examples of customers who have purchased the product and how well it’s performing for them
  • Talk about fewer, but better, ideas.
  • Talk to the audience, not to the slide.
  • Talk about your flaws and problems openly and honestly. I’ve attended some sales training events where the trainer tries to give the impression that the product is perfect, only to find out later that the product is so flawed that no one buys it. We all know that no product is right for all customers (except perhaps a life preserver on a sinking ship), and salespeople get suspicious when some marketing windbag drones on and on about how perfect a product is. Talk openly about problems, and you’ll build credibility.
  • Break it up. In terms of scheduling, I suggest three to four 90-minute sessions per day with 30-minute breaks in between. The world doesn’t stop for salespeople in training. They need time to do their work and respond to customers, so don’t make your training an 8 AM to 9 PM forced march. If you do, people will tune out (or simply leave).
  • Ask for feedback and answer questions truthfully. Remember—you’re all on the same team, so give people the information they need to do their jobs well.

DON’T

  • Pack slides with dense text. Stick to just one main idea per slide. Dense text practically forces eyes to glaze over and attention to wander.
  • Say “I only have a couple more slides” when your time is up. Plan and practice your presentation to ensure you can complete it easily within the allotted time, with a few minutes left over for questions.
  • Get too technical. Nobody wants to hear you droning on about your new “hex-head screw” or something similar. Focus on big ideas and concepts.
  • Name-drop anecdotal quotes or information. The fact that one customer recently told you that your product was interesting is light years away from having multiple customers actually buying the product at a profitable price.

Sales training is often considered an afterthought, or a “should” to complete before you turn your new salespeople loose. Don’t make this mistake, which is maybe the biggest “don’t” of all. Good training pays for itself many times over in job satisfaction, retention, effectiveness and—let’s not forget—more sales. Put some time and effort into doing it well.